I grew up in Wales, around the west coast, seaside town of Aberystwyth, that is surrounded by luscious green hills and mountains. Due to my surroundings, I’ve always been aware of the importance of the environment and its protection. I studied Human Geography at University as I was interested in the relationship between humans, politics and the environment, and how these three things in turn affect each other.

I did not carry on working in this field and for the last 5 years I have been working in the world of Human Resources. Knowing that I have always wanted to work for the NGO and charity sector, I see this opportunity with YEE as a way for me to follow my passions. I believe that empowering young people to believe that change can start with them is really important and I am looking forward to learn how YEE engages young people in campaigns and how they work together with different organisations across Europe towards one goal.

Some children want to grow up to become a fireperson, cook, teacher or pilot. I had a slightly different ambition:

I wanted to become an environmental activist.

I dreamed of a future where I would chain myself to trees, sail in front of whale killing boats and never ever get a driver license.

YEE is happy to share our new publication "Edible Plants - Tools for Youth Workers". The publication is created by Coline Malot, YEE's 2017-2018 EVS Volunteer as a personal project within her EVS programme. 

This booklet will focus on tools and ideas for youth workers so they can provide environmental education for young adults, through foraging and cooking wild plants. The aim is to connect young adults with their direct environment and to develop environmentally-friendly behaviours. A broader aim is to solve environmental issues in a way that fosters individual and collective well-being and emancipation, taking into account other society issues like socio economic disparities or cultural differences.

Edible Plants - Tools for Youth Workers

 

YEE Member, Young Researchers Serbia, organised a week long training course “Green Voice of Youth in Media” in Avala, Serbia between 19-26th of August. 19 participants coming from all over Europe developed their skills and knowledge on environmental sustainability, social media tools for organisations, campaigning and more using non-formal education methods. Secretariat member, Cansu Yetisgin represented YEE as a participant.

Participants shared the different environmental practices such as eco-labelling and availability of sustainable products in their local markets, what is sustainable green living concept and green purchase behaviour and fairtrade. During the training course, participants had also the opportunity to learn from experts about how to use social media tools to increase the visibility and reach of youth organisations, Mattia from Legambiente, delivered a training on how to create successful campaigns and later participants created their own environmental campaigns based on problems they think are important for them and their community.

Later, participants had a training on green entrepreneurship and came up with their own ideas to pitch to the juree of trainers. Among many great ideas were; a green marketing agency, initiative for sustainable clothing and entrepreneurship idea on food waste.

Last task of the participants was to create a follow-up action in their local communities, so keep your eyes open for many great actions all over Europe to spread the green message!

My EVS is coming to an end! What to say? This was a very busy year, full of discoveries, learning, friendship and emotions. I gained in confidence, I learnt tuns of new things and I met great people from all around Europe and beyond.

When I started my EVS, I had no idea that I would work with a cow, explore deep caves in wild Moravia, be a facilitator in a training course, learn how to cut wood with a chainsaw and make such close friends. I am really thankful to YEE for this huge opportunity and for giving me the space to try new things, to acquire new skills and to grow up.

 
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