Green Colonialism

The large-scale deployment of solar and wind capacities, along with electric batteries, is particularly demanding in critical raw materials, most of which are currently imported.

Could this trend amount to a new form of colonialism?

Green Colonialism​

The large-scale deployment of solar and wind capacities, along with electric batteries, is particularly demanding in critical raw materials, most of which are currently imported. Could this trend amount to a new form of colonialism?

Practical information

  • When

    Monday 3rd July at 17h CEST

  • Where

    Online

  • How

    Register your interest

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In the third webinar of the AmPower series we explore the notion of “Green Colonialism”! What is that all about?

With each new legislative package adopted in the framework of the European Green Deal, the target of renewable energy deployment has increased. The current pledge is at 42,5% of the European overall Energy mix by 2030. But the large-scale deployment of solar and wind capacities, along with electric batteries, is particularly demanding in critical raw materials, most of which are currently imported from 3rd countries.

Could this trend amount to a new form of colonialism? Is the European Commission tackling this issue head-on with its proposal for a raw critical material act?

Speakers

Stephanie RichaniStephanie Richani is the advocacy lead at Equinox Initiative for Racial Justice. Equinox Initiative for Racial Justice is a people of colour-led initiative working to advance rights and justice for all people in Europe. We work in solidarity with a coalition of racial and social justice leaders and organisations to influence European Union law and policy.

Emily Iona StewartEmily Iona Stewart has a background in European labour law. Emily first began working on environment and climate issues a decade ago as the chief policy advisor to the Vice Chair of the European Parliament’s Environment Committee.

She has specialised in European climate and sustainability policy, playing a decisive role in forming the EU’s Sustainability strategy, which eventually led to the European Green Deal. Working across political lines, Emily has also authored legislation on supply chains, biofuels, and land rights. 

Emily is the Climate Advocacy Specialist for the Open Society Foundations Just Transition pillar. In this role, she helps form OSF strategy on European climate policy, as well as maintaining and influencing networks within the European policy landscape.